Category Archives: First Line

Prompt

# 24

Write 25 first lines for your novel.

Jot them down quickly (you already have a first line, and you’re working on a book, so you know where you’re going–this will be an easy exercise), a minute or less per line.

That first line is a promise to your reader. It can show voice, hint at character and plot, show mood and it certainly should grab the reader.

So what are you doing with YOUR book opening?

Remember, Richard Peck (LONG WAY FROM CHICAGO, A YEAR DOWN YONDER) says, “You are no better than your first line.”

Once Richard read the first few pages of my novel that is under consideration right now. “You don’t have your best first line,” he said. He was right. I chopped off the first paragraph AND learned a valuable lesson from a great writer.

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Filed under First Line, Life, Publication, Revision, Uncategorized, Voice

Thursday Prompt

# 19

I just challenged one of my writing friends to this writing activity.

Now I will challenge you all.

At the beginning of the day,

each day,

before you write,

set a timer for three minutes, then write the first line of a new work.

A new picture book, a new short story, a new YA novel, memoir, poem, piece of nonfiction, etc.

That’s all.

Just one line.

Keep each one on a 3X5 card.

If emotions comes along with that line, jot them down on the back. A few ideas follow?Put those notes on the back, too. When the timer beeps, you stop writing and go to your WIP.

Put the 3X5 card next to your computer and watch the pile grow.

Let’s do this until WIFYR on June 12. We’ll get about 30 starts. Take off a day or two, if you want (I try to take the weekend).

On your mark, get set,

Let’s go!

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Filed under CLW, Exercises, First Line, writing process

Three Thing Thursday

LoriAnne:

For the first time in a year, I’m not in a writing class. And it’s weird.  My writing group is sort of on hiatus since last semester ended. So there isn’t anyone I feel accountable to. I don’t report a wordcount to anyone, or turn in a revised chapter. I’m forced to examine if I’m going to write every day, on my own, without the points tied to grade, like a carrot dangling in front of me. Do I do what I say I love to do?

I’m happy to say yes, I am writing, and enjoying it. I’m having fun watching my characters unfold and surprise me. It’s not as often as I should be writing.  It’s several times a week, but not daily.  I’ve decided to set some personal goals in this season of goal setting — one short-term daily goal, one mid-range goal, and one long-term goal.

1.       Writing is like exercise – it’s better to do even a little bit every day, than to do nothing and atrophy, or try to do a huge marathon session in one day and have a stiff brain and wear yourself out. Just 100 words keeps your creativity muscles toned and ready whenever an idea presents itself. I always feel better about the day ahead of me if I’ve written in the early morning. I’m not looking at writing as a chore anymore, but something I do because there are moments of fun for me. Those moments are coming more often than they used to, so I keep plugging away. My only problem is do I write or do I exercise? Writing is winning hands down – literally. My hands are down on the keyboard instead of on a yoga mat.

2.       My mid-range goal is getting my writing group back together. We miss each other, and I enjoy their stories, and their insights on my story. A once-a-month meeting should not be that hard. Hope they are reading this. I’ll be sending an email today, girls 🙂

3.       Set a long-term goal, like attending a conference, and sign up where possible to meet with an editor or agent. I’ve signed up early and pushed myself out of my comfort zone to do more than sit and enjoy the speakers. This way I can make progress towards my goal of getting published. When you sign up for a workshop or writing conference, plan to have something critiqued, then let your daily writing work towards writing your piece a little every day.

What strategies are you using to set your writing goals this year? See you at the conferences!

Carol:

Last night, Ann Dee Ellis, Kyra Leigh and Kristyn Crow traveled to my class to speak about writing. Each girl has a book coming out this year and they all read from their work. AMAZING!

Carol Again:

Don’t forget Friday’s party!

Go here to register: http://www.wifyr.com/events/

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Filed under Ann Dee, Exercises, First Line, three thing thursday

Tomorrow . . .

we begin.

How many of you will participate in NaNoWriMo?

Once again, I shall try. And we’ll see if I make it past week one. Or day two. Ha!

I have lots of questions for you to consider for tomorrow and I have this awesome quote from a NaNo leader here in UT.

Gatanathoa says, “Every word you write counts unless you delete it. Make the planning part of your writing. Have two docs, one for your musings and one for the outline. Every thought you have put in the musings doc and everything that makes it into the story put in the outline. In no time you will have your novel all planned out and you will be able to start the full story.”

I’d never considered this. But I will use it in my writing over the next month.

Now, a few questions to consider as you brainstorm.

Can a free write help you get started?

How can that free write play toward your novel, so that it not only counts as numbers totaled, but is a useable scene?

Who is your main character?

Who is her enemy?

Write a scene between the two.

Do you know the climax of your novel yet? Do you have an idea? If so, can the scene play toward that?

What does your character really want?

Name ten ways you’ll stop her from getting that ‘thing’ she wants.

Can any be expanded into a scene?

What is your first great line?

Who is the love interest?

Write a scene with him/her.

That should get you started.

Good luck!

Oh, and here’s this: WIFYR will be hosting a reward party! Our group goal is 400,000 words OR, if you’re in the middle of a masterpiece, a second group is editing 2000 pages (8 pages a day per person). All who meet their goals are invited to come to the reward party. Whether your goal is 20,000 words or the full 50,000, or you’re editing 8 pages a day or 15, this month is a good time to reach your goalsClick here to join the group or email us at wifyrdoesnano@gmail.com.

 

 

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Filed under Exercises, First Line, writing process

Ten Minutes for Beginnings

Running a blog for years–a blog about writing–well, one begins to wonder what one should write about.

Okay–that’s the line I started with. Then I thought–what am I going to say today? What’s new out there?

Probably nothing, actually. But as I sat here I remembered something Richard Peck said years ago when he was here in UT. He was talking to a group of writers and teachers. His bit of wisdom that I’ve repeated in every writing class I’ve taught since? “You are no better than your first line.”

That means for anything, I think. The first line of a campaign speech, of a novel, of a poem, newspaper, article, essay, picture book. Your blog.

“Your novel,” Richard Peck told us that day, “may start chapters in. Find the right beginning.”

“Start your novel where the story starts,” I tell my students. On the day something new happens. Don’t waste time with back story.

Get in and get on with it. Grab your reader and run.

“My book gets great right about page 40,” people will tell me. (And yes. That’s about the number they all say). Common sense tells us that means the story starts on page forty. Someone has some work to do.

While Richard was here, he looked at the first three pages of a novel I’d begun. He asked me two questions, one of which was, “Does this start in the right place?”

I dropped him off at the airport that day and as I drove away I realized he was right about the book. I’d started wrong. I chopped off the first line–a bit of Florida description, I think–and the book began right where it needed to.

“What you doing, Girl?” Daddy said, when the burying was done.

Introduction of two characters, a bit of voice and a problem. Buried because of an extra line. Exposed, front and center when the first line was chopped away.

A great first line won’t save a bad novel. But it can set you up as a writer and point you where you need to go. It can offer a feeling of what you may now do. It can be a promise to the reader.

I’ve not sold this book and it’s been years. There have been two editors interested. And now another editor is looking at that novel. But I learned something from Richard that I’ve tried to use in every book since–get rid of what isn’t needed. Quit meandering.

Write the story and only the story. Readers just don’t care about the rest.

So in this blog? Cut off the first 50 or so words. That’s where this piece really begins.

Now go do that to your books.

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Filed under CLW, Exercises, First Line, Voice

Confession

by Lisa Sledge

Please don’t hate me when I tell you.  I slept through two-thirds of the final action sequence in Avengers. In my defense, the action went on for a very long time. Don’t get me wrong, action/adventure films and books are high up on my list of favorites. So what happened? How could I sleep through the climax?

Two things.
I could predict the ending.
I didn’t care.

I read a lot of blogs on writing. One common thread of advice is that the best way to capture an audience’s attention is to ratchet up the tension from the very first page and never let it stop. That readers will only care to finish the book if they’re riveted  by an unending series of action.

What crappy load of garbage to feed aspiring writers (and yes, I definitely still fit in the “aspiring” category).

But seriously.

A reader will finish if they care. Action isn’t intense unless we’re desperately cheering for the hero/heroine. It isn’t enough to like them. We have to be invested in their relationships, troubles, and fears. We have to love them enough to be scared for them.

This week as we’re writing, let’s stop trying to hook our readers with series of unending action. The action can happen . . . but it’s not the most important thing. Let’s first strive to write a world with characters whose problems capture a reader’s heart.

That should be our goal.

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Filed under Character, First Line, Plot, writing process

Something for You to Do (Because We All Know You Aren’t Busy Enough)

Three things about me and yesterday:

1. Last night I washed my hands right before bed.

Then I went to take out my contact lens and found–when it was too late–that I had left a large blob of soap on my fingertip. That blob of soap went into my eye. There was so much, no lie, that it foamed up as I blinked and tried to wash the stuff out.

Today I have a bit of a handicap. Won’t be able to see to drive. Eye nearly shut. Sort of alligator looking.

2. Still no house. I am almost numb now. What are we to do?

3. I am reading (started yesterday) John M. Cusick’s funny YA novel CHERRY MONEY BABY. Quite enjoying myself. 🙂

 

But on to writing!

Over the next week, take these five starts and write–one per day.

Spend no more than 15 minutes per (unless you get excited and want to write longer).

Write to explore the idea. Use sense of place. Use strong dialog.  Pretend like each of these books is a new start for you. Don’t use up your own novel writing time, but  give yourself an extra fifteen minutes, each day, to play with us.

Next week, we will share.

There is no particular order. By the end of the week, though, you want to have worked on all these starts. They may be first lines for you, they may be in the middle of the 15 minutes, they may be the end. Doesn’t matter. You decide.

Here goes!

 

# When Maddy stepped out her front door, she saw right away that things had gone wrong with the world.

# Poppy spit a stream of tobacco juice, catching a little in his beard.

“Charlotte,” he said, “You and me got some talking to do.”

#”Mark!”

In the background of my mind, somewhere deep in the anger, I heard my name.

“Mark! Stop it!”

Her voice was louder. More clear. And I was more aware of the pain. Pain everywhere.

#Why did he always, always, take dares?

# Where was Bella? I glanced at the clock and my heart pounded with the clicking second hand. If she didn’t get here quick . . .

What was it with these  unionized fairy godmothers? They worked in shifts or not at all, took long breaks and refused to give a princess what she wanted.

 

Happy writing. Have fun. Play. Just as bed-ridden, amazing Ann Dee would say.

 

PS Please pass on word of WIFYR (www.wifyr.com) to any and all your writing and illustrating friends. Remind them about the $1000 prize and possible publication prize, open to all attendees.

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Filed under Ann Dee, Character, CLW, Exercises, First Line